Case studies tagged with Eucalyptus

Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Closterocerus chamaeleon a biological control agent of the eucalyptus gall wasp Ophelimus maskelli

Female Ophelimus maskelli & Female Closterocerus chamaeleon

Among essential oils, Eucalyptus oil, is one of the most useful as it is easily extractable commercially (industrial value) and possesses a wide range of desirable properties worth exploiting for pest management. Eucalyptus oils are mainly extracted from leaves which can be attacked by gall wasps as Ophelimus maskelli. Induced galls can affect the essential oil production.

This work aims to determine the role of the parasitoid Closterocerus chamaeleon in the biological control of its host O. maskelli.


Modelling seed germination of five species of Eucalyptus to facilitate optimal reforestation

E.saligna morphological aspect  (A: fruit, B: seed, C: plant (6months after seed sowing) (INRGREF, 2016))

Eucalyptus is an enormous and fascinating genus with over 700 species. Most of Eucalyptus species are known as aromatic plants and with medicinal and melliferous uses. Therefore, it’s important to valorize and ensure a continuous regeneration of Eucalyptus species. In this prospect, the main focus of this work was to evaluate seeds viability used to regenerate forests and in order to elevate its production of NWFP.



Synergies between forest owners and medicinal plant distiller : The case of Eucalyptus in Andalusia

Collection of eucalyptus branches and foliage in the surrounding forest properties

In the Doñana National Park in Andalusia, short-rotation coppice eucalyptus plantations occupy large areas and belong to private forest owners.

« Esencias Garcia-Palomo » distillery uses 5,000 kg of eucalyptus branches and leaves every day for its production of 10 to 40 kg of essential oil. Not being a forest owner, this resource is a cost to the company.

Mr. Palomo has organized with his neighbors to work in symbiosis and limit the costs of their respective operations : the collection of his raw materials contributes to the silviculture of coppices of eucalyptus.