Case studies tagged with decision-making tool

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Application of Eco:Actuary in the Thames catchment, UK: A series of tools to operationalise strategic planning and investment for Natural Flood Management. H2020 NAIAD Project.

EcoActuary: an open-access catastrophe model capable of assessing the impact of green infrastructure on local and downstream assets at risk of flood.

Using the widely used Policy Support System tools at www.policysupport.org as a basis, we built an insurance industry-relevant policy support system called Eco:Actuary. The objective of this project is to to co-develop and test the Eco:Actuary with NAIAD project partners & stakeholders in the fluvial non-tidal Thames as a DEMO catchment in the NAIAD project. 

EcoActuary is an open-access catastrophe model capable of assessing the impact of NBS on local and downstream assets at risk of flood.  It simulates a minimum of 1200 spatial...More


GREEN DEAL Green roof

Sources: http://www.hoogendoornbv.nl/pg-27798-7-103916/pagina/arbeidsvoorwaarden.html

The GREEN DEAL Groene Daken (Green Deal Green Roofs) is a cross-sectoral initiative whose ulimate objective is to upscale the implementation of green roofs, whilst at the same time remove barriers that inhibit their implementation . This initiave aims to develop new revenue models and apply them around roof greening. Through the GREEN DEAL initiative, citizens or companies that want to invest in green roofs, receive information about the opportunities invest in a green roof and lead their project when it starts.


Phase 2 has started since 2016. The focus of the initiative is ...More


Oslo BiodiverCity - Maintaining ecosystem services in a rapidly developing but biodiversity rich city

Oslo has been one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in Europe (Stange et al. 2018). However the area that is available for development is limited by the protected Marka forest surrounding the city to the north and east, and the fjord to the south. The growing population is being accommodated at the rate of around 3000 new buildings every year and the need for 100 000 new buildings is predicted by 2030 (Oslo Municipal Plan 2015-2030). Oslo has the highest species diversity of any municipality in Norway, with a large number of species found in-between buildings in the built zone....More